IDF

A Jerusalem Vision, Jerusalem Day–Yom Yerushalayim

A Jerusalem Vision, Jerusalem Day–Yom Yerushalayim

Aaron Ettinger was one of the paratroopers who fought in Jerusalem during the Six Day War, and was severely wounded on Salah e-Din Street near Damascus Gate.

A few years ago, at a Jerusalem Day sing-along at a synagogue around the corner from the President’s Residence, Aaron was given the microphone to recount his experiences during the two hellish days of the battle to liberate the city in June 1967.

The elderly, slightly portly man with a full head of white hair topped with a knitted kipa, spoke about the number of his comrades (mostly reservists from kibbutzim) who fell in the worst of the fighting that took place on the northern side of the Old City on Nablus Road, Salah e-Din Street and in front of Damascus Gate.

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Posted by Judy Lash Balint in Essays
Generations of valor

Generations of valor

There is one day a year when the red flag is still carried proudly through Jerusalem: May 9th, Victory Day. The flag is carried by WWII veterans, whose achievements and sacrifices brought Nazi Germany to its knees.

Posted by Rachel Sharansky Danziger in Images
We made it. Now what?

We made it. Now what?

I was born into a world in which Jerusalem was already united. For me, the image that really dominated a lot of my educational experiences, at Hebrew School and summer camp, was the iconic picture of the paratroopers at the Kotel. Wow, a picture really is worth more than a thousand words.

Reflecting on that image, I realize the resolution of that photo really has sharpened over time. I once met the talented photographer, David Rubinger, who recently passed away. He was in a Jerusalem coffee shop and we struck up a conversation; he explained and demonstrated how he had to lie on the floor of the narrow Kotel passage to get that angle he wanted.

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Posted by Marc Rosenberg in Essays
“When I’m in Jerusalem during Independence Day, I…”

“When I’m in Jerusalem during Independence Day, I…”

Did you ever wonder how other people complete this sentence?

Well, this year we decided to find out, and asked different people to share their favorite Jerusalem-related Yom Haatzmaut activities/experiences/outings in Jerusalem. Some answers might surprise you, some might resonate with your own experiences, and some might give you ideas for next year!

Happy Independence Day!

***

“When I’m in Jerusalem on Independence Day I am full of gratitude and humility to be living the dream that countless women, men, and children prayed with tears, hope and faith would one day come true.”

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Posted by Rachel Sharansky Danziger in Images, Snippets, Videos
When the siren sounds on Mt. Herzl

When the siren sounds on Mt. Herzl

The photographs of Israel’s military ceremonies on Memorial Day are usually evocative closeups that are beautifully composed. A young child lies on his father’s tombstone. A grandmother weeps at her granddaughter’s grave. A brother stands silently between the trees, his head bowed. Rows of identical, symmetrical tombstones are punctuated by glowing memorial candles, dotted with flowers, and garnished with flags of blue and white. The images are solitary; the settings expansive.

But if you go to Mount Herzl for the siren on Yom Hazikaron, the scene is very different. As you approach the military cemetery, you become part of one large mass of humanity, bound by a common history, a common fate, a common purpose – and a common deadline: to be at a graveside by 11:00 a.m.

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Posted by Shira Pasternak Be'eri in Essays

Remember the Soldiers

Yesterday I was walking along the Haas Promenade, The Tayelet, overlooking the Old City of Jerusalem.

What a remarkable ancient, holy view with the sun shining and reflecting off the beautiful Jerusalem stone. A site that has been fought over for thousands of years. So much history.

#View of The #Jerusalem #Israel #oldcity from the #haas #promenade #religion #religious #holy #holiness #prayer #tmunot_israel #all_israel #ig_israel #israel_best #israelgram #igerisrael #instaisrael #instagramisrael #instagood #israel_life #israel_times #israel_only #blogger #blogging #travel #tourism #travelblogging #lifeinisrael

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Posted by Tova Knecht in Essays
The Feeling of Jerusalem

The Feeling of Jerusalem

The energy of these stones has provided the nourishment for many generations of the Jewish people, for all those who keep Jerusalem in their hearts as the nucleus of their universe.

There is no other sensation in the world like the one when one’s hand is touching those warm, wise stones; the stones which are speaking to you; one to one.

Unique sensation
The first time I visited Jerusalem about thirty ago, in the end of 1980s, on the occasion of the Jerusalem Festival. My husband and I, both working in theatre at the time, were participating in it together with our good friends from a legendary Taganka theatre. It was the first ever visit to Israel for them as well, and we all were trembling of excitement and disbelief at being on Israeli soil.

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Posted by Inna Rogatchi in Essays, Videos

Where soldiers Knit

I took this picture while boarding the 74 bus in Jerusalem. I think it captures the beauty and complexity of our city and its people.

Posted by Arnie Draiman in Images
A chest full of medals at Yad Vashem

A chest full of medals at Yad Vashem

Six survivors were honored to light memorial torches at Yad Vashem, Moshe Ha-Elion, Moshe Jakubowitz, Jeannine Sebbane-Bouhanna, Max Privler, Moshe Porat, and Elka Abramovitz. A child or grandchild assisted in lighting the flames. A video recalling the harrowing experience in the Shoah was shown for each survivor. The audience sitting in the bitter cold plaza was silent during each amazing story of survival.

While each story was riveting, the story and chest full of medal’s of Max Privler stood out. His Yad Vashem biography states, “Privler was born in 1931 in the village of Mikulichin in Poland (now Ukraine) to David and Malka, the second of four children. His family owned land, factories, shops, and even a school and a synagogue.

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Posted by Sharon Altshul in Essays

From war to light

One of those photos that I can’t even believe I took…

It was an incredible moment to capture. Photographed during a Chanukah candle-lighting ceremony on an army base on the outskirts of Jerusalem. The menorah was made out of the remains of Hamas rockets that exploded in Israel, and were turned into a beautiful work of art. The blessings were made by an IDF officer, and the little wicks were lit while dozens of soldiers stood at attention.

And there, in the crystal clear glass of the oil cups, is the inverted reflection of all of those soldiers…

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Posted by Laura Ben-David in Images, Snippets